About Bob Canterbury, totem carver

April 20, 2012

Uncategorized

For the Linger Longer Outdoor Theater totems, Robert Canterbury carved a bear, face, beaver and thunderbird into one of the totems. An owl, a baby, a whale and an eagle inhabit the other.

Bob Canterbury  was born in Quilcene and lived there for the first 50 years of his life.  He now lives and carves on Camano Island, WA.

Totem Poles carved by Robert Canterbury are loaded at Camano Island for transport to Quilcene

Totem Poles carved by Robert Canterbury are loaded at Camano Island for transport to Quilcene

Canterbury started carving in 1977.  He has carved for a living for nearly 25 years.

Bob Canterbury, Carver

Bob Canterbury, Carver

Bob Canterbury winning an award for his carving in 1982

Bob Canterbury winning an award at the Western Washington Fair for his chainsaw-carved totem pole in 1982

Canterbury’s Quilcene Oysters in History

Bob’s father, the late Robert Canterbury Sr. is the man most people credit with putting Quilcene oysters on the map. For decades, Robert Canterbury Sr. harvested oysters on 50 acres of Quilcene Bay tidelands down at the end of Linger Longer Road.

From the beginning, the name of Quilcene was synonymous with wild oysters of exceptional quality. Canterbury’s “Quilcenes” were served in fine restaurants in Portland, Seattle and New York City. Canterbury copyrighted the family name, and for a while some people thought a “Canterbury” was actually a species of oyster. The historic Canterbury Oyster Farm on Quilcene bay was a major producer of Quilcene Oysters until it ceased operation in 1991.

Canterbury Oyster Farm on Quilcene bay was a major producer of Quilcene Oysters until it ceased operation in 1991

Photo from the book: A Geography of Oysters: The Connoisseur’s Guide to Oyster Eating in North America By Rowan Jacobsen

Canterbury Oyster Farm on Quilcene Bay  today. Operations ceased in 1991.

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